Family farms in the Pelican area were, generally, “red” or “green.” And the Erhard July 4th parade has always had a friendly competition between the “red” FarmAlls and the “green” John Deere guys. Sadly, the Erhard 4th of July parade was canceled this year because of the COVID-19 outbreak. Pictured here, the John Deere representation in the 2016 Erhard parade.
The accompanying poem was inspired by a John Deere, and the Isaacson family farm in the Dunvilla-Dunn Township area.

A Pelican Rapids Press reader brought in a unique poem, with local connections, that are appropriate following 2020 Father’s Day.

The poem was brought in by Vern Isaacson, Lake Lizzie area, who grew up in the Dunvilla area and graduated at Pelican High School in 1957. Vern’s father, Hilbert Isaacson, was well known in the Pelican area, and served on the Pelican school board for some 20 years, back in the 1940s and 1950s.

The Isaacson farm in Dunn Township is still in the family

The poem was written by Aaron Kling, Vern Isaacson’s son-in-law, who owns one of the Isaacson’s John Deere tractors—which was, in part, the inspiration for the poem.

Here’s what Kling wrote about the poem, and the poem itself—an appropriate Father’s Day message,

“Raked some hay today and got to 9900 hours on the 3020. I’ve thought about restoring the tractor, but I think the scars and worn paint add something. My wife’s great-grandfather bought this tractor new. With today being Father’s Day, I had thought about the time he spent on this tractor, his hard-working generation, and wrote this poem.

THE MAN WHO SHINED THAT FENDER
The man who shined that fender,
He’s just an antique now.
Things like RTK and GPS replaced
“How straight can you plow?”

The man who shined that fender
Has seen a lot of come and go
Went through some droughts, a flood,
And Jimmy’s grain embargo

The man who shined that fender
Worked sun up to sun down
To build a kingdom made of dirt
Sought no castle, sought no crown.

The man who shined that fender
Raised a family on a few hundred acres
Now it’d take 2,000 to break even
So he just rents it to the neighbors.

The man who shined that fender
His time has come and gone
But for those he taught along the way
Forever, he’ll live on